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With many shoppers eschewing in-person stores this year due to Covid-19, experts are predicting that Cyber Monday and the entire online holiday shopping season will see record amounts of traffic. Before you hit Add to Cart, make sure that your personal cybersecurity protocols are ready for all that retail therapy with these quick tips!

1. Shop on secure sites (look for the lock!)

Security should be the foundation of your shopping habits so make sure that your favorite e-commerce sites are secure by looking for the lock icon in the URL bar and making sure the sites start with HTTPS instead of HTTP. Secure websites help protect data that you share when making purchases.


For our last personal story of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month we’re speaking with Killian Brady, Arceo’s Vice President of Insurance, who reminds us that it always comes down to people, process, and technology (people first!).

What brought you to cybersecurity/cyber insurance?

I studied political science in college and had plans to go to law school but wanted to get some real-life work experience first. Insurance seemed like an amazing opportunity because it presented a chance to work at the intersection of law and business and would give me a good foundation on which to start a career in either field.

Specializing in cyber insurance and the technology side of insurance meant that I was able to focus on how underwriting is tasked with navigating emerging trends and never-before seen risks. When I started out as an underwriter, cyber insurance was positioned as a subset of professional liability. It was really considered a niche product and we were focused on raising awareness of cyber and helping companies understand what the risk could look like. But as cyber events have gotten more coverage in the press and organizations have seen the impact of cyber risk, it has certainly evolved. It’s been a really interesting field to work in. …


Cybersecurity and cyber insurance can, at times, feel overly impersonal but at their heart, they are industries fueled by actual people. The Arceo team will be sharing personal stories from our team all month long as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

Today we’re chatting with Samantha Disabella, Arceo’s Senior Underwriter.

What brought you to cybersecurity/cyber insurance?

I studied marketing and communications in college, but after I graduated, was still unsure what I wanted for my career. After a conversation with a friend who was an underwriter, I decided to look into insurance. I started out as an underwriting assistant and ultimately ended up on the cyber team. From there I moved into underwriting, where I had a chance to learn more about cyber insurance and cybersecurity. …


Awareness goes beyond tips so as part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, the Arceo team will be sharing personal stories of how we got our start in cyber insurance and what keeps us passionate about helping our customers!

Today we’re chatting with Vic Marchetti, Arceo’s Vice President of Distribution.

What brought you to cybersecurity/cyber insurance?

I’d studied finance and management in college but a few years after I graduated made a shift to insurance. My dad is in the insurance industry so in some ways, I always knew that long term, insurance would lead to great career opportunities.

When I shifted to insurance I started in Errors & Omissions, with a focus specifically in cyber.. I’m very grateful that I ended up with a cyber focus. It’s an ever-evolving industry, where some other lines of insurance can be more mundane. I’ve found that even though cyber may be a newer focus for a lot of companies the impacts can be just as severe. It’s validating to be on the cutting edge of finding solutions to those risks for our customers. …


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October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. As part of our efforts to raise awareness, the Arceo team will be sharing stories all month long about how we got involved in cyber insurance and what awareness means to us.

Today we’re chatting with Sean Gremillion, Arceo’s Vice President of Underwriting.

What brought you to the field of cyber insurance?

In college, I initially enrolled in organizational leadership but Illinois State University has a nationally recognized insurance and risk management program so I joined that as well. After graduation, I joined a firm with an underwriting-focused early career development program and had a choice of three different business units, one of which was E&O (Errors & Omissions) which contained cyber and tech E&O. I really loved the dynamic of the E&O team and as a kid I always had a passion for computers and technology. …


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In some of our recent blog posts, the Arceo team has written about the most common threat vectors at work as well as ways to make sure you and your team maintain your cybersecurity, but one of the best ways to maintain cybersecurity is by creating a culture of cyber resilience in your workplace. Today we’ll share 5 tips from our own team for making sure your workplace has a cyber secure culture in place — and has the tools to maintain that culture in the face of risk.

1. Keep your cybersecurity protocols up to date and be transparent with changes

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again — a clear and transparent cybersecurity protocol and policy is the first step towards both a culture of cyber resilience and towards actual protection in your workplace. Helping your employees to understand what is expected of them (and when!) will give them the tools and the confidence they need to be partners in security and will give management the tools they need to enforce policies. Providing your entire team with guidelines will help everyone know how to move forward in a new secure world. …


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Defining cybersecurity processes within your workplace is one of the most important steps towards building a culture of cybersecurity but you may be asking yourself — how do go about building a cybersecurity team? Should I hire a CISO or CSO? What role does my CEO play? What even is a CRO? You’re not alone in feeling a bit overwhelmed when it comes to building a team within your organization so we’ve pulled together a quick guide to getting started. …


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Chances are the first word that comes to mind when you think of the US military isn’t “entrepreneurial.” But reality is that this isn’t your parents’ military. Today’s veterans came of age after 9/11 and are just as likely to have spent their service negotiating with a local magistrate or installing drip irrigation in a village as serving in combat. To succeed in today’s military, leaders must be determined, flexible, and compassionate. They must be able to lead diverse groups of women and men, while also being able to adapt to unforeseen circumstances in unfamiliar environments — all skills that serve leaders well in entrepreneurial surroundings.To say that today’s business leaders are facing unique challenges would be putting it mildly. Right now we are grappling with the worst pandemic in 100 years, the highest unemployment rate since the Great Depression, the most societal unrest since the 1960s, and a cavalcade of natural disasters brought on by climate change. …


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We find ourselves in a digital world of disappearing boundaries and increasing speed. Today, most government agencies, companies, and organizations still run their own networks with their own devices. Over the last few years, chief information officers and chief information security officers (CIOs/CISOs) have been planning gradual moves to the cloud and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) architectures. This is sometimes referred to as “post-infrastructure” and COVID-19 has moved that timeline up by five years.

Military planners know that time can be a strategic asset or a major liability. The immediate result to a post-infrastructure world will be disappearing network boundaries and less visibility into what devices are running on them. There will also be increased demand on high-speed connectivity and 5G network infrastructure. Employers, including the US government, will have to grapple with how to deliver these resources while also protecting people at the individual level, including on their home networks and personal devices, while balancing privacy. …


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It’s widely acknowledged that employees are a company’s biggest asset and also one of the largest risk areas when it comes to cybersecurity at work. How can these threats impact the overall security level of your organization and which threat vectors are the biggest risk for your particular organization? We pulled together the following list of cyber risks that are especially important when considering organizational threats — and added a few that are new on the scene since we’ve largely transitioned to working from home.

1. Lack of processes or oversight

Many organizations are missing the basic systems and protocols that help their employees know how to practice good cybersecurity behavior and let them know who to contact when they see a risk. Establishing these processes goes a long way towards ensuring a culture of cybersecurity within your company and protecting you both before and after an attack. These policies are especially important now that workforces are moving towards a largely remote posture. …

About

Resilience

Making organizations cybersecure by providing them the tools, guidance, and solutions to insure and secure their data. https://www.resiliencesecurity.com/

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